How Educators Can Incorporate nTop Platform into Their Courses

nTopology announces its new nTopEd Partnership Program. We are teaming up with educators, researchers and students to take design for additive manufacturing and advanced manufacturing to the next level. Learn how to get nTop Platform into your institution!

Lizabeth Arum
September 17, 2019 • 4 min read

Here at nTopology we are eager to help not only small to medium sized businesses and large enterprises design better parts, faster but we also want to help educators teach, learn and research the latest trends for design engineering. To do this we created nTopEd, an education partnership program. 

In addition to providing access to our nTop Platform for educators and researchers, we also want to help them collaborate with one another as well as with our team, so we’ve created the nTopology Education Community. This community is an open forum for professors and students to engage in meaningful conversations about what can be achieved with our software and will enable the members of this community to stay abreast of new functionalities as well as changes in our software.  In turn, members of this community commit to contributing feedback, making recommendations, as well as sharing notebooks, workflows, and stories about how they are integrating the software into their curriculum and research.

 

Simulation of various gyroids under pressure. Image courtesy of Air Force Institute of Technology and Air Force Research Laboratory.

 

Tim Simpson, PhD, Director of Penn State’s Paul Morrow Professor of Engineering Design and Manufacturing says, “We are excited to start using the new nTop Platform in our Additive Manufacturing & Design graduate program at Penn State.  Many of our students have enjoyed using Element, but the design and automation capabilities to optimize designs for additive manufacturing in nTop are remarkable.  It’s going to take our lattice lectures and design projects to a whole new level!”

Where can you find nTop Platform in schools? To name a few: Boston University, Duke University, Rochester Institute of Technology, MIT, and CU Denver. This list isn’t exhaustive and is continuously growing. 

If you or your institution is involved in design for additive manufacturing, advanced manufacturing, topology optimization, generative design, simulation, or other engineering applications, nTop Platform can help you explore those areas more in depth. In turn, educators, researchers and students will learn the next generation of software taking you beyond CAD. To learn more please reach out to education@ntopology.com. To apply for nTopEd partnership, please fill out this education form.

Written by
Artist, tinkerer, and educator, Liz is the Education Partner Manager for nTopology. She brings eight years of experience introducing and integrating desktop 3D printing into education, working at Makerbot Industries, Tinkerine, and Ultimaker. Passionate about connecting people and ideas and creating communities, like the Ultimaker Pioneer Program, she is a co-founder of Construct3D, a vendor-agnostic national 3D printing and digital fabrication conference and expo focused on academic use, best practices, and professional development opportunities for faculty, staff, and students from informal, K-12, and higher education contexts. Liz is a graduate of the Cooper Union and NYU’s ITP.

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